Vote for The Organic Adventurer’s recipe

Here at Team TOA, we are so excited to be included in the Beyond Meat weekly recipe challenge!

This week our Fajitas Verdes recipe has been selected to go toe to toe with one of Beyond Meat’s recipes. Savory refried beans, spicy fajita veggies, creamy avocado and, of course, a little not-chicken. It’s delicious, easy, quick and a hit with the whole family!

Fajitas Verdes: A little bit fajita, a little bit enchilada…a whole lotta yum!

We’re doing great so far; please vote for our recipe on the Beyond Meat Facebook Recipe Challenge page by clicking here. Voting ends tomorrow at 11:00 p.m.!

Left! Vote for the one on the left!

Thanks!

Meat Analogues: A tofu, tempeh and seitan primer

One question we get a lot from clients looking to transition to a meat-free diet or just to eat a little less meat is about meat analogues, plant-based foods that are generally thought of as analogous (comparable) to meat in the plant-based diet. Some of our clients have never tasted tofu, tempeh or seitan and don’t know what they’re made of. Many have heard of them from friends or perhaps have had them in a restaurant meal but aren’t sure how to prepare them at home. We’re here, as always, to provide some clarity in what we hope is a simple, straightforward way.

Previously, we discussed tofu and tempeh, which are both made primarily of soy. Today’s topic, seitan (pronounced say-TAHN), is a whole other…well, plant. Seitan is made by rinsing all the starch from wheat flour dough. What’s left is a firm blob of gluten (the protein) that can be cut, shaped, colored, flavored and cooked in an endless variety of ways. That’s the attraction of seitan: it’s the most flexible of the three we’ve discussed in mimicking animal-based products. It can be made to look like shaved meat, strips, chunks, a ham, a turkey breast, burger patties, meatballs, cutlets…okay, you get the idea!

Two different versions of prepared seitan: chunks and strips.

Actually, only certain preparations of wheat gluten are properly called “seitan,” but we Westerners tend to have access to fewer of these products and lump them all together as “seitan,” so we won’t split hairs.

Prepared seitan would most likely be found in the refrigerator case alongside the tofu and tempeh, either packed in water or vacuum-sealed or both. The most common forms are pre-cooked strips or chunks, but large markets will have access to a wider variety.

Prepared seitan vacuum-packed in water.

Prepared seitan chunks (left) and strips (right).

Prepared, packaged, uncooked seitan tends to have a bit of a rubbery texture that takes on more structure as it’s cooked, not unlike chicken. Some people actually stop eating meat because they’re not fans of that texture, so they may not be fans of this type of seitan either. Others are big fans of that “meaty” texture, and so may like seitan as well. This kind of packaged seitan also has a noticeable wheat flavor that mostly dissipates as it’s cooked. We’ve found that homemade seitan (more on this later) has less of that rubbery texture. This is, of course, all a matter of opinion; you may want to do some experimentation to identify your preferences.

So, let’s talk nutrition. Last post, we called seitan the “sinful not-meat” for a reason. It’s the most processed of the three we’ve discussed so far. As a wheat gluten product, it’s not something that someone with any kind of gluten sensitivity would want to eat. It does have the least fat (tofu wins for lowest calories) of the three, but it also has less of the good stuff like fiber, calcium, iron (almost equal to tofu, but about half that of tempeh), potassium and so on. Also, prepared seitan usually has way more sodium.

You can make your own seitan at home as a means of controlling the sodium level and what ingredients are added. As a matter of fact, you can make your own tofu and tempeh at home too, if you’re so inclined. If you do want to DIY, seitan is pretty easy because there’s a shortcut available. Just make sure you purchase “vital wheat gluten” as your raw ingredient, as there are a few different glutens, proteins and flours out there that won’t give you the same results.

Vital wheat gluten, for making seitan at home.

Because of its nutritional profile, we don’t tend to use seitan in the TOA test kitchen. We usually save it for eating-out situations where it’s either the best vegan option on the menu or the one that sounds most intriguing, so the only TOA seitan dish we’ve got a photo of is this stir-fry where the seitan chunks have been coated in organic cornstarch and lightly fried.

Stir-fried seitan.

There’s a fantastic vegetarian restaurant in Athens, Georgia, called The Grit. Their Deluxe Grilled “Steak” sandwich and Seitan Gyro really demonstrate the variety of textures and tastes you can achieve with seitan. This shaved and seasoned version is almost indistinguishable from beef and looks and tastes nothing like the chicken-style seitan chunks in the stir-fry above.

Peeking out at the top left, you can see the beef-style shaved seitan in the veganized Deluxe Philly Cheesesteak from The Grit.

The Grit’s Seitan Gyro also features the beef/lamb-style shaved seitan. For our money, though, the Split Pea Dal was the star of the meal!

And with that, we’ve come to the end of the mock-meat trilogy! Before we wrap up, though, a reader sent in a question about TVP, wondering if it was the same thing as seitan and, if not, what it was. TVP and seitan are, indeed, quite different. Seitan is made out of wheat gluten, whereas textured vegetable protein, or TVP, is made of soy (soy protein isolates, to be specific).

Textured vegetable protein (TVP) needs to be rehydrated and is commonly used as a ground beef substitute or in veggie burgers.

Seitan has more protein, but is not a complete protein in and of itself, whereas TVP is. That doesn’t mean it’s better for you though. TVP is even more processed than seitan, and most of the nutrients are cooked out of it. It also has a high sodium count and contains naturally forming MSG. So, if forced to choose one or the other, we’d go with the seitan.

In the interest of bringing things full circle, we’d like to remind readers again, especially those who are celebrating their participation in No Meat March, marveling at how much better they feel and, perhaps, contemplating going meat-free for good, that you don’t have to eat these meat analogues as part of your plant-based diet. You can get along perfectly fine with beans, nuts, legumes, fresh vegetables, rice and so on. Conversely, even if you don’t end up eschewing meat, putting a tempeh steak instead of a beef steak on your plate every now and then will do your body, the planet and the cow a whole lotta good.

If you’d like to know more about meat substitutes, a plant-based diet, or…well, anything else that affects our planet (and, therefore, your health and wallet) contact us! We’re here to help.

Meat Analogues: A tofu, tempeh and seitan primer

Part 2: Time for tempeh!

One question we get a lot from clients looking to transition to a meat-free diet or just to eat a little less meat is about meat analogues, plant-based foods that are generally thought of as analogous (comparable) to meat in the plant-based diet. Some of our clients have never tasted tofu, tempeh or seitan and don’t know what they’re made of. Many have heard of them from friends or perhaps have had them in a restaurant meal but aren’t sure how to prepare them at home. We’re here, as always, to provide some clarity in what we hope is a simple, straightforward way.

In the last post, we were talking about tofu, which is made from soybeans. Our favorite of the meatless triumvirate, tempeh, is also made from soybeans but by a markedly different and fascinating process: fermentation. (For more on fermentation, go to our store, click on “cookbooks” and choose The Art of Fermentation—great book!) The beans are soaked and the outer layer, or hull, is removed. The beans are lightly cooked just to start the breakdown process and then inoculated with the fungus that will ferment them over the next day or two. In some varieties of tempeh, the beans are mixed with various grains, seeds or other ingredients. Rice, flax seed and barley are common additions.

Edamame: soy beans in their raw, unprocessed form. Image courtesy of ponsulak / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Edamame: soy beans in their raw, unprocessed form. Image courtesy of ponsulak / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Because tempeh is only very minimally processed, even less so than tofu, it retains a lot of the nutritional profile of its whole ingredients. More of the bean is left intact, so tempeh contains a lot more fiber than tofu. It also contains roughly twice the protein of tofu, more iron and is chock full of phytonutrients (very beneficial nutrients specific to plants). But many of its nutritional advantages come from fermentation, which makes the soy more digestible, reduces phytic acid content allowing for better mineral absorption, and, like many fermented foods, is supportive of the gut biome (the living world of microorganisms in your gut that scientists are just now beginning to realize may play a much larger part than previously understood in such important things as one’s immune system function). Besides, with the toothsome texture of a soaked nut and a dense structure, it’s just plain satisfying!

Tasty and nutritious!

You’ll find tempeh in a variety of forms in the grocery store, but we’ll concentrate on the most basic, most readily available form in the U.S.: the refrigerated cake. These cakes come in all sorts of different dimensions, but are usually vacuum-sealed. The tempeh itself looks like large grains of rice or very small, halved peanuts pressed tightly together. Sometimes you’ll see a white substance in between the bean pieces and sometimes there may be small dark spots on the tempeh. Both of these are very normal outcomes of the fermentation process and perfectly safe to eat.

Make sure your tempeh is either organic or Non-GMO Project verified—or both!

It bears repeating that, like tofu, tempeh is made from soybeans. And since, at least in the U.S., 94 percent of soybeans grown are genetically modified, we recommend choosing organic tofu or tofu with the Non-GMO Project Verified label if you’re trying to avoid GMOs (which you can read more about here). The Non-GMO Project Verified label looks like this:

Now, what to do with that cake of tempeh? Most tempeh commercially available in the U.S. is technically ready to eat out of the package. (If you do see a product labeled “fresh,” know that it probably needs to be cooked thoroughly before eating. Refer to the package instructions.) That means no draining or additional prep before you start working with it. Tempeh is every bit as versatile as tofu as far as the flavor profile it can take on and the preparations it can be used in. It has a very mild mushroom or chestnut aroma and tastes just slightly nuttier than tofu. Because of its density and crumbliness, it’s a natural in any dish that calls for ground meat. Its density also works well in dishes that call for the patty to remain intact such as burgers or steaks. We forgot to photograph the tempeh out of the package before simmering it with liquid aminos for the chili! You can still see the nutty, dense texture though. And tempeh doesn’t really change color as it cooks unless you’ve used a marinade that might darken it slightly, so the photo reflects its packaged color as well.

One of our favorite tempeh dishes, especially in the winter, is a nice, hearty chili. This recipe came from the perennial plant-based kitchen companion, Isa Chandra Moskowitz of The Post Punk Kitchen. It goes great with this cornbread! Breaking up the tempeh as in the picture below gives it the look of ground beef (or turkey because of the color) and makes it work very well for recipes that call for ground meats.

Add water to the chili during cooking only as needed. If you like a thick chili, you’ll find that the amount of water called for in the recipe makes it too soupy. Also, the recipe calls for pinto beans, but it’s great with red kidney beans or black beans too.

The chunks of cooked tempeh have a texture very similar to that of ground beef.

The chunks of cooked tempeh have a texture very similar to that of ground beef.

For the cornbread, instead of cooking the flax and water mixture (which works like an egg to bind the batter) you can just put it in the fridge to thicken for about 15-20 minutes. We also always add a cup of corn kernels to the batter for that “something special.”

A stick-to-your-ribs meal that’s completely free of animal products!

Grilled tempeh burgers (or go bunless and call them steaks!) make for a great summer dish. The tempeh holds up really well on the grill and gets nice char marks. We paired these juicy beauties with packet-grilled leeks and a cool quinoa and chickpea tabbouleh. Sadly, we can’t remember where the recipe for the marinade for these tempeh steaks came from, but Googling “tempeh steaks” brings up some tasty-sounding options.

Finally, here’s a family-friendly Quick and Easy Sloppy Joes with Tempeh and Black Beans recipe from Florida Coastal Cooking. It’s tasty and so quick that it makes for a great weeknight meal. Plus, it won Mr. TOA’s “Man-Food Seal of Approval,” so it went in the favorite recipes notebook long ago! Again, you won’t miss meat at all with the toothsome tempeh in this hearty sandwich. For fewer calories, make it open-faced.

Other easy ways to introduce yourself and your family to tempeh are to use it in tacos, in the “meat” sauce for your spaghetti dinner nights, or to use smoky tempeh bacon in your BLT for lunch—a TLT! As you practice cooking with tempeh, though, branch out and explore: maple grilled tempeh, tempeh and wild mushroom fricassee, tequila tempeh (¡Olé!)—there are so many things you can do with tempeh, you’ll never get bored!

Yes, bacon addicts, it does exist! (Go easy though; check the sodium!)

We’d love to hear your tempeh tales! If you’re less familiar with tempeh, what else would you like to know about it? What other questions do you have? If you’ve used tempeh before, what are some of your favorite recipes? What tips do you have for preparing and cooking with it? Let us know in the comments or send us a message through the contact page!

Next up: Seitan, the sinful not-meat! So let us know what questions you have about seitan as well.

Meat Analogues: A tofu, tempeh and seitan primer

Part 1: Tofu Who?

One question we get a lot from clients looking to transition to a meat-free diet or just to eat a little less meat is about meat analogues, plant-based foods that are generally thought of as analogous (comparable) to meat in the plant-based diet. Some of our clients have never tasted tofu, tempeh or seitan and don’t know what they’re made of. Many have heard of them from friends or perhaps have had them in a restaurant meal but aren’t sure how to prepare them at home. We’re here, as always, to provide some clarity in what we hope is a simple, straightforward way.

Image courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Before we start though, there’s a misconception (maybe more of an oversimplification) to clear up. Knowing that if one person is thinking something, many more are too, it occurred to us that some clarification was in order when a client asked about “that stuff vegans eat,” referring to tofu. However it was that tofu became a marker of the meatless diet, let us assure you that not all people who choose a plant-based diet eat tofu—or tempeh or seitan. One very important thing to understand about these foods is that they are, after all, processed in some way.

Plenty of plant-based eaters, especially in this age of heightened awareness of the connection between nutrition and health, prefer to get their nutrients from whole, unprocessed foods such as beans, legumes, nuts, dark green veggies and the rest of the vast array of foods the garden, field and orchard provide. There are also plenty of plant-based eaters who just plain don’t like meat analogues. Also worth noting is that just as not all plant-based eaters eat tofu, not all who eat tofu are vegan or vegetarian. Our point is that if you choose to follow a plant-based diet (or are just exploring, perhaps for No Meat March), you don’t have to eat tofu, tempeh or seitan. And there’s no guard at the grocery store prohibiting omnivores from picking up a package of tempeh. These foods are, like any other, just options in a vast buffet.

We guarantee you will not hear, “Ma’am, I can’t let you buy that tofu; you’re not on the list,” at the grocery store! Image courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

We guarantee you will not hear, “Ma’am, I can’t let you buy that tofu; you’re not on the list,” at the grocery store! Image courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

With that out of the way, let’s start with tofu. There are a lot of different kinds of tofu, different preparations, etc. but someone just discovering it would likely find tofu as a white block about 5 x 3 ½ x 2 inches, similar in appearance to a brick of white semi-soft cheese, either vacuum-sealed on the shelf or packed in water in the refrigerator case. We’re pretty sure its enigmatic appearance contributes to the confusion. What is it? What is it made out of? What do you do with it?

Tofu doesn't have to be a cubic conundrum!

Tofu doesn’t have to be a cubic conundrum!

Tofu is made from soy beans, those beans you get steamed as an appetizer called edamame at some Asian restaurants. The beans are soaked, ground, boiled and strained to make a soy milk, not unlike the almond or soy milks you might see at the store. The soy milk is then coagulated using a salt or an edible acid and the resulting bean curd is pressed into the blocks you buy.

Edamame: soy beans in their raw, unprocessed form. Image courtesy of ponsulak / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Edamame: soy beans in their raw, unprocessed form. Image courtesy of ponsulak / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

So the process is somewhat similar to curdling, straining and pressing dairy milk to make cheese. In that respect, it is technically processed, though minimally so relative to all of the commercial, prepared, pre-packaged “fake meat” products on the market.

Nutritionally, tofu is high in protein and relatively low in calories and fat. A 4-ounce serving contains 10 grams of protein. Compared to the 95-calorie and 5-gram of fat “cost” of that 4-ounce serving, it’s a pretty good deal. Those are, of course, general numbers that will vary with the style and preparation. Also, tofu contains none of the artery-clogging cholesterol of meat and provides quite a bit of calcium, iron and other minerals.

This is a package of water-packed, refrigerated tofu.

Tofu is an interesting food to work with because it’s so versatile. It has very little odor or flavor of its own, so it really is what you make of it. Much like people use marinades containing sugar, salt, fat, spices, etc. to flavor meat, tofu can take on a Southwest flavor, an Asian flavor, a sweet Polynesian taste, really anything you want.

The most common reason people give for not liking tofu is the texture. Refrigerator-case tofu is packed in water to maintain its moisture content until the consumer is ready to use it. Straight out of the package, it’s rather spongy. You can use it this way, most commonly in miso soup with little cubes of tofu, by just draining off the water and slicing it. We’ve found, though, that not everyone realizes that the majority of uses for the block-style tofu call for the water to be pressed out of it and for it to be cooked in various ways, which gives it quite a different texture.

Pressed extra firm tofu has a texture almost like chicken that’s more moist and tender than chicken could ever be.

There are also, as we mentioned, different styles of tofu that each have a different texture. Tofu is usually sold as “silken,” “firm,” and “extra firm” in order of most to least moisture content. Silken tofu can also be sold in blocks, but is easily blended or mashed to resemble a thick yogurt and is also sold in cups or containers in that form. It’s very useful in recipes to thicken or impart a creamy texture. Firm tofu is often described as having a custard or fat-free cream cheese texture. If you’re not a fan of that texture, you may find you don’t like firm tofu. This was the root of the problem of one client who said he had tried tofu and didn’t like it; he had chosen the “middle one” (firm) and followed a recipe that called for very light cooking. No surprise that he also wasn’t a fan of foods like gelatin. He became a tofu convert after trying extra firm tofu that had been pressed and baked. Pressed extra firm tofu has a texture most like that of very moist poultry. That’s the type we’ll concentrate on for preparation.

But first, one more note about choosing your tofu. As previously mentioned, tofu is made from soybeans. At least in the U.S., 94 percent of soybeans grown are genetically modified. So if you’re trying to avoid GMOs (which you can read more about here), we recommend choosing organic tofu or tofu with the Non-GMO Project Verified label, which looks like this:

NGP-Seal-Revised-Draft-for-FSIS3

Okay, on to the fun stuff. Now that you’ve got your tofu home, what to do with it? The first order of business is to press it. You could equate this pre-seasoning step to an omnivore having to thaw meat from the freezer. First, drain off the water the tofu was packed in. There are two ways to proceed from here. You can either wrap the tofu in a clean cloth, place it between two plates and put some weight on top or, especially if you think you’ll be using tofu on a regular basis, you might want to invest in a tofu press like this:

Go to our online store at http://theorganicadventurer.com/shop/ and click on “housewares” to see the info for the tofu press used here.

Either way, check your tofu periodically and drain off the liquid that’s been pressed out. This usually takes an hour or two. If you use the cloth method, you may need to change the cloth if it gets saturated.

Once your tofu is pressed, the preparation, seasoning and cooking method depend entirely on what you want to do with it. Just like there are different cuts of meat used for different purposes, you could cut your tofu into small cubes for soups or stir fries, large triangles for laying over beds of greens or large squares or rectangles for sandwich use. Also much like meat, your seasoning or marinade will depend on the type of cuisine, and whether you bake, fry, sauté or whatever you do with it will depend on the recipe. Here are a few we’ve experimented with just to give you an idea of the versatility of tofu.

For a decadent Sunday brunch, this Tofu Florentine from the cookbook Veganomicon by Isa Chandra Moskowitz and Terry Hope Romero features a light, broiled tofu with a rich, creamy sauce.

Tofu Florentine

This Baked Pineapple Curry Tofu with Fried Basmati Rice and Veggies from long ago came from Dawn Hutchins of the Florida Coastal Cooking blog. You can see the cubes of baked tofu that were marinated in pineapple juice, miso and curry imparting a fantastic sweet-savory-spicy punch.

Baked Pineapple Curry Tofu with Fried Basmati Rice and Veggies

This Hearty One-Pot Meal Miso Soup is one of those recipes that makes enough for the freezer. It’s also very convenient, in that you can throw in whatever vegetables you need to use up. The original recipe called for edamame (soy beans) but we used small cubes of pressed, uncooked tofu instead. We also used the dark miso we had on hand rather than the white miso in the recipe.

Hearty One-Pot Meal Miso Soup

Lightly frying small rectangles of tofu in sesame oil for this peanut satay-style dish gives the tofu an almost crispy outer crust.

Tofu Peanut Satay

Cubes of tofu matched in size with the veggies and crusted in a sassy adobo seasoning made for yet another delicious meal from Florida Coastal Cooking! P.S. Chef Dawn includes a tutorial video in that post about “shaving” tofu cubes to make them look more like chicken chunks.

Grilled Adobo Tofu and Veggies

And finally, the recipe for this Filet O’ Tofish sandwich came out of Alicia C. Simpson’s fun cookbook Quick and Easy Vegan Comfort Food. The entire block of tofu is sliced into four large rectangles and marinated in kelp powder to impart that ocean flavor. The “filets” are then breaded and baked.

Filet O’ Tofish

So there you have it: what tofu is, how to prepare it and some suggestions for cooking with it. If you’re less familiar with tofu, what else would you like to know about it? What other questions do you have? If you’ve used tofu before, what are some of your favorite recipes? What tips do you have for preparing and cooking with it? Let us know in the comments or send us a message through the contact page!

Next up: tempeh! So let us know what questions you have about tempeh as well.

What’s this about a plant-based diet? Find out during No Meat March!

Thanks in part to a certain famous firefighter, a lot of people have been exposed in the last year or two to the “plant-based diet.” Maybe some of you have tried it or thought about trying it. Maybe you even bought that red and yellow cookbook. But, you know, your friends looked at you funny when you mentioned it, your ever-helpful relatives sent along a box of steaks for the holidays, and it just kind of didn’t happen. Or maybe you’ve just seen all this new stuff at the grocery store and wondered, “Who eats that?” “Does it taste good?” “Is eating that way really healthier?”

Well, starting on March 1, you’ll have the opportunity to get all of your questions answered, your curiosity satisfied, and your efforts rewarded by more support and positive reinforcement than you know what to do with!

That’s because every March is also known as “No Meat March,” a whole month set aside to try out a plant-based diet for yourself. Originally a local initiative started by The Girls Gone Green, an organization based out of Jacksonville, Florida, dedicated to “exploring environmental, animal and health issues,” the effort has since spread far and wide, even to other countries!

So here’s how it works:

1) Go to the No Meat March website

2) Click on the “Take the Challenge” tab

3) Pledge to not eat meat for the entire month, or even add in dairy and eggs

4) If you’re on Facebook, “like” the No Meat March page (Trust us, this is key.)

That’s it; just a few mouse clicks…so easy!

And here’s what you’ll get out of signing up:

1) Daily emails full of info, tips, recipes, support, event announcements and more (“Daily” might sound like a lot, but you’ll quickly realize that you look forward to them, if for no other reason than that when you see the “No Meat March, Day X” title, you really feel great about sticking with something for that many days.)

2) A pledge card that entitles you to discounts (woo hoo!) at select No Meat March-area (Jacksonville, Daytona, Orlando and Tampa) restaurants

An old pledge card, but you get the idea.

3) Invitations to tons of different events throughout the month: speaking events where you’ll hear from experts, demos, fundraisers, potlucks, field trips, good old parties and more (Seriously, there are so many! Keeping track of all the invites is just one of the reasons connecting on Facebook is a good idea.)

4) A community of people ready, willing and able to support you (This is another great reason to connect on Facebook: share your successes and challenges, get answers to your questions, find support from like-minded people no matter what your reason for taking the challenge.)

5) Better health and healthier habits (If nothing else, really thinking about the food you’re eating for a month might provide the impetus for making some healthy changes. Maybe you’ll find you didn’t realize just how much you snack or how big today’s meat portions have gotten. You never know until you try. One thing’s for sure though: You will feel better by the end of the month. The first thing most people taking the challenge report is that they feel less sluggish and have more energy. Hey, that alone is worth 31 days, right?)

First up in this exciting challenge is the No Meat March kickoff event on February 28. This is really going to be a great time. There will be an animal product-free dinner at 6 p.m. at Latitude 30 in Jacksonville for those who purchase VIP tickets. That will be followed by a screening of Unsupersize Me (click to watch trailer), which will be followed by a Q&A with two experts in the fields of health and fitness. We’ve got the details below, but to purchase your ticket (either VIP or just movie/Q&A), go to the No Meat March event page.

 

Of course, there’s a lot more we could say about No Meat March, but there’s nothing like having the experience yourself.

And we here at TOA will be right there with you the whole time. We’ll be doing a series of No Meat March-related posts, answering reader and client questions, from now through the end of March, so comment with your questions, stories, suggestions, recommendations or whatever else you’ve got, or use the contact form to send your thoughts directly.

If you’re ready to take the challenge, we can help! Your custom consultation can include nutrition issues, eating-out guidance, meat-free cooking at home (How about a private lesson or a small-group demo with friends?), reading labels, shopping…we’ll even go to the store with you (in person if you’re local or via phone if you’re not); you don’t have to make that maiden meat-free shopping voyage alone!

Finally, whether you’re ready to ditch the animal products entirely or not, there’s a lot you can do for your health and the health of the planet. Use the contact page to schedule your consultation today. (Remember: We also do mini-, one-question consultations!)

Happy No Meat Marching!